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01 August 2007

Talking turkey while taking a break

Another World Series of Poker has come and gone, but it was a tough year for me. I think the two years since I won the main event caught up with me and fatigue affected my game, especially on the last day of the event when I busted out. It should never have happened. I just played too many hands, wasn’t focussed and the fatigue that came into play.

I had enough chips on day two but I found myself in almost every hand. Finally when I busted, I think I’d almost given up mentally. I pushed in with A 8 on a board of A 10 10. Another guy called with A Q, and his queen played. I was just over grinding in big events like this, and it’s all about grinding.

Since I’ve been home, I’ve tried to catch my breath. The WSOP taught me a big lesson that I’m not superhuman and I couldn’t keep going physically at the same pace. In hindsight, there’s no training to become world poker champion, there’s no way to prepare for what happens. It just comes from nowhere. I have to give myself time to recuperate otherwise I’ll burn out in the next year or so.

So it’s been a quiet time in terms of poker. I played in the Vic Champs, which I enjoyed, and went to Sydney for the Wild Turkey Celebrity Challenge in my new role as an ambassador for Wild Turkey.

I had a ball commentating the final table, which was eventually won by Bulldogs NRL player Willie Mason. Wild Turkey donated $10,000 to The Cancer Council, Willie’s chosen charity. Willie defeated Glenn Stewart, from the NRL Manly Sea Eagles, Pat Davern from the band Grinspoon and ironwoman Candice Falzon.

I love the fact that Wild Turkey has aligned itself with poker. I’ve always had fun with my poker, and the best part about it is kicking back, having a few Wild Turkeys and a laugh with your mates. That’s the spirit of Wild Turkey – it’s all about keeping it as a genuine fun experience.

I’m also really looking forward to the PokerStars.net Asia Pacific Poker Tour events in Manila and Seoul. The APPT team have done a fantastic job in getting the tour off the ground. PokerStars don’t do anything by halves, so augers well for the success of the APPT. 

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